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BEFORE YOU SAY I DO TO FARMING 2 – LESSON LEARNT (THE QUAIL BIRD VENTURE)
Agro-business

BEFORE YOU SAY I DO TO FARMING 2 – LESSON LEARNT (THE QUAIL BIRD VENTURE) 

Here are a few lessons most of you may want to recap from their failed agro-business ventures , and also take note especially the quail bird farmers  

#1 do not borrow, no loans !

Why is this #1? Why does it have an exclamation point after it? Because—listen up—in the past fifty years, debt has tanked more farms than drought, plague, and pestilence combined. If there’s one thing our national housing crisis has reinforced, it’s how economically debilitating debt can be for the average person. Farmers aren’t immune to these challenges. Legions of great producers have abandoned their farming dreams simply because they couldn’t pay their debt when the bank came calling.


 #1 do not borrow, no loans !

Why is this #1? Why does it have an exclamation point after it? Because—listen up—in the past fifty years, debt has tanked more farms than drought, plague, and pestilence combined. If there’s one thing our national housing crisis has reinforced, it’s how economically debilitating debt can be for the average person. Farmers aren’t immune to these challenges. Legions of great producers have abandoned their farming dreams simply because they couldn’t pay their debt when the bank came calling.

In a nutshell, debt (borrowing money, with interest) allows us to accelerate our goals, turning dreams of tomorrow into realities of today. While borrowed money might buy us a tractor, a new barn, or even the land we’ll be farming, experience, the most valuable farming asset of all, cannot be purchased.How many times have you read the newspaper about a big wig , our ministers being sucked by a loan ,let alone you a simple farmer

 

#2 IDENTIFY YOUR MARKET BEFORE YOU START

 So you want to raise Quails, grow watermelons, or start a honey bees business. Maybe you just want to sell cottonl to local knitters. Awesome. I like steaks, chips, and fried quail  as much as the next guy. But how are you going to find customers like me? Do I live in your neighborhood, or five hundred km away? How much of your stuff will I buy? How will you find others like me? What will you do if I buy ALL of your stuff, and you’re sold out? What will you do if I buy NONE of your stuff, and you’ve got a barn full of it?

Before you plant that first seed, raise your first quail bird, or harvest your first summer bee-hive, take the time (lots and lots of time) to figure out where you’re going to sell your products, who is going to buy them, and how you’re going to do it. Once you’ve done this, create a backup plan. Then, come up with another backup plan. Chances are you’re going to need them.

 

 #3 match your land to use

here i have those guys who did potato sacks in mind .We can try to force our human dreams onto the land, or we can work with what nature gives us. On our farm, maize, goats, cotton ,tail rabbits, and hanga  naturally flourish. As such, it’s no coincidence that we’re able to raise free-range chickens, sheep, cattle, and pigs on our land. While the correlations may not be identical, when we stand back for a moment and consider the landscape, there’s a nice pattern here.

Conversely, a few years back, we tried raising free-range pigs. We learned the hard way how they evinced their waterfowl instincts: In a matter of weeks, they turned acres of pasture into muddy ponds.hope you didnt not miss as i said it 

 

 #4 DONT WORRY ABOUT WHAT OTHERS THINK OR ARE DOING 

In 2014, when I was twenty NINE years old, I found myself talking to an older farming couple at a local party. We both raised chickens  for a living, but they sold their birds straight to corn-fed diets. They asked me about my farming ambitions, and I told them of my dream to sell 100% free range fed chickens. The birds would be completely organic, and I’d direct market the meat myself. I told them our farm could provide food for several hundred families once I really got going.

Their reaction? When I had finished speaking, they turned to each other, made eye contact, and burst into uncontrollable laughter.

two  years later, i mean today boschvelds varieties are leading in demands , its no secrete for zimbabwe ! on contrary , were are we with the quail bird farming – lesson lent 

 

Rule #5: Set Reasonable Goals

Yes, yes, we all know that you were a Distinction student at chibhero college, the captain of the fencing team, and sold out all your first chicken batch before end of week when ripe . You’re talented, we get it. Now repeat after me:

“It’s okay if I can’t feed the entire Harare, so long as I can supply my local market.

It’s okay if I don’t make ‘X’ number of dollars this year, as long as all of my expenses are paid.

It’s okay if I don’t add an additional enterprise, until I get really good at the 3 other enterprises I’m already trying to master.”

 

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